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Cemeteries and monuments

Cemeteries of South-Artois

Statue en hommage aux soldats australiens venus en soutien durant le conflit de la Première Guerre Mondiale : le Digger.Cliquez sur l'image pour zoomer
Statue en hommage aux soldats australiens venus en soutien durant le conflit de la Première Guerre Mondiale : le Digger.

Ablainzevelle

  • Ablainzevelle communal cemetery, in the communal cemetery we find the the grave of one unidentified soldier from Commonwealth. German casualties have been removed.

 

Achiet-le-Grand

  • Achiet-le-Grand Communal Cemetery Extension. The cemetery was used by Commonwealth medical units from April 1917 to March 1918, then by the Germans from March to April 1918, and again by Commonwealth troops in August 1918. 1424 Commonwealth casualties and 42 German casualties. Among them 200 are unidentified. The extension of the cemetery was designed by Sir Edwyn Lutyens.
  • In the Achiet-le-Grand Communal Cemetery Extension, a memorial was erected at 8 Commonwealth sailors and soldiers. An other memorial remind the names of 8 British soldiers, 1 Canadian soldier, 1 New-Zealand soldier whose the place of inhumation isn't knew.
  • Achiet-le-Grand Communal Cemetery contains four Commonwealth burials of the First World War.


Achiet-le-Petit

  • Achiet-le-Petit German Cemetery (1314 German casualties) (chemin de l'Attre et de la Blanche Nappe, lieu-dit le Cimetière). The cemetery was created at the autumn 1914 by the Germans. The great majority are victims of the Battle of the Somme.. 


Ayette

  • Ayette Indian and Chinese Cemetery (80 casualties of 1914-18) (place called la Citadelle). The cemetery was established by British fighting troops in September 1917 and used until the following April and again in the autumn of 1918. 
  • Ayette British Cemetery (54 casualties of 1914-1918) (place called le Faubourg). The village of Ayette remained in British hands from March 1916 to the 27th March 1918, when it was captured by the enemy. It was the scene of fighting by the Guards Division on the 28th and it was retaken by the 32nd Division on the 3rd April 1918. Ayette British Cemetery was made by fighting units in March-June 1918.

 

Bancourt

  • Bancourt British Cemetery (2 480 casualties of 1914-18) (place called le Grand Droit). The cemetery was begun by the New Zealand Division in September 1918. After the Armistice,  graves were brought in from the surrounding battlefields. The majority of the casualties are soldiers fell during the winters 1916-1917.
  • Bancourt communal cemetery.  It contains the graves of 6 officers of the Royal Flying Corps (one of them unidentified) buried by the Germans in the autumn of 1916 and one soldier from New Zealand who died in September 1918. There is a memorial to an Australian soldier, buried in the cemetery in April 1917, whose grave was destroyed by shell fire. 

 

Bapaume

  • Bapaume Australian Cemetery (87 casualties of 1914-18) (place called le Pré Pot de Chart). Bapaume was occupied by German forces on the 26th September 1914, and by the British on the 17th March 1917. It was retaken by the Germans on the 24th March 1918, and by the New Zealand Division on the following 29th August. It has given its name to the battles of the 24-25th March 1918, and the 31st August to 3rd September 1918. After the war, Bapaume was adopted by Sheffield. This cemetery was begun in March 1917 by the 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Station, and used until the following June. In April and May 1918, 23 German casualties were added. 
  • Bapaume Communal Cemetery. Bapaume in the path of the Germans when, in May 1940, they swept through the gap between Rethel and Hirson on the French Army's front, and across country to occupy Amiens and Abbeville as the British Expeditionary Force fought its way to the coast. There are 25 graves of 1914-18.


Barastre

  • Barastre Communal Cemetery. Barastre was occupied by British troops in March, 1917, lost in March, 1918, and cleared by the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division on the following 5th September. 15 British casualties, one of whom was buried by the Germans in 1916. 


Beaulencourt

  • Thilloy Road Cemetery, Beaulencourt (Chemin de Barque, place called le Fond de Cavignies). The cemetery was begun by the 53rd Field Ambulance early in September 1918. The cemetery contains 240 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. There are also ten German graves. The cemetery was designed by J.R Truelove.


Beaumetz-les-Cambrai

  • Beaumetz Cross Roads Cemetery (286 casualties of 1914-18) (rue du Camp, place called Devant Mont Vaast). The village was captured by the enemy on the 22nd March, 1918, after an obstinate defence by the 51st (Highland) and 25th Divisions, and retaken in the middle of the following September. This cemetery was begun by fighting units in March 1917 and used until February 1918. After the Armistice, casualties of 1917-18 were brought in from the surrounding battlefields. 286 casualties in this cemetery. 
  • Beaumetz-les-Cambrai military cemetery n°1 (257 casualties of 1914-18) (route de Cambrai à Bapaume, place called Derrière Provent). The cemetery n°1 was made by the Germans after the fighting of March 1918.


Bertincourt

  • Bertincourt Château British Cemetery (47 casualties of 1914-18) (place called Ossimont). Bertincourt was occupied in March, 1917, evacuated on the 24th March, 1918, and re-occupied by the 1st Canterbury Infantry Battalion on the 3rd September, 1918. The 7th K.O.Y.L.I. buried in this cemetery at the end of March 1917 and other units in September 1918. There are 47 Commonwealth casualties. 


Beugnâtre

  • Beugnatre Communal Cemetery. Beugnatre was occupied by British troops in March, 1917, lost in March, 1918, and recaptured by the 2nd King's Own Scottish Borderers on the 26th August, 1918. 10 British soldiers are in this cemetery.


Beugny

  • Delsaux Farm Cemetery (495 casualties of 1914-1918) (on the corner of the street of Lebucquière to Haplincourt; place called Ferme Delsaux). Delsaux Farm was a point on the German defensive system known as the Beugny-Ytres line, which was reached by Commonwealth troops on 18 March 1917. The farm was lost on 23 March 1918 after the gallant defence of Beugny by the 9th Welsh Regiment and their withdrawal, but it was retaken by the 5th Division on 2 September 1918, and on the next day the same division occupied Beugny village. After their advance in March 1918, the Germans made a cemetery and in it buried 103 Commonwealth and 82 German dead. In October-November 1918, the site was extended by the 29th and 46th Casualty Clearing Stations.  A little later, the German graves of March 1918 were removed. In this cemetery there are 495 graves and 32 marked "Buried near this spot" The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwyn Lutyens.
  • Red Cross Corner Cemetery (219 casualties of 1914-18). This cemetery was made between April 1917 and March 1918 by field ambulances and fighting units. It contains 219 casualties. The cemetery was designed by W.H. Cowlishaw.


Bihucourt

  • Bihucourt Communal Cemetery. It contains the graves of one soldier from the United Kingdom and one unidentified New Zealand soldier.


Bucquoy

  • Plaque in memory of Louis-François Marcot (at Essarts, 17 rue Principale). Louis-François Marcot, major of the 81th DIT, killed at fighting of Essarts the 4th October 1914.
  • Bucquoy Communal Cemetery. The cemetery of Bucquoy was used by the Germans in 1914-16 (graves removed today). The village was occupied by the 7th British Division on 17th March 1917, and was the scene of very heavy fighting in March and April 1918. There are ten British casualties. 
  • Bucquoy Communal Cemetery Extension (place called le Bourg). The cemetery was made by the Royal Naval Division burial officer at the beginning of September 1918. It contains 68 First World War burials, all dating from 23-28 August 1918. The extension was designed by Sir W. H. Cowlishaw.
  • Queens Cemetery, Bucquoy (chemin de Puisieux, place called le Bourg). The cemetery was begun in March 1917 when 23 men of the 2nd Queen's were buried. Today, there are more than 700 casualties.
  • Shrine Cemetery (place called le Bourg). It is named from a crucifix . It was begun by the 46th (North Midland) Division in March 1917, and enlarged by other units in August 1918. This cemetery contains 89 Commonwealth casualties and a German casualty. Cemetery designed by WH Cowlishaw.

Bullecourt

  • Cross at deceased
  • British and Australian war memorial 
  • Commemorative park and monument at Digger

Chérisy

  • Québec Cemetery (195 Commonwealth casualties of 1914-18). Chérisy was  captured by the 18th Division on 3 May 1917, but lost the same night. It then remained in German hands until it was retaken by the Canadian Corps on 27 August 1918. This cemetery was made by fighting units. Cemetery designed by G. H. Goldsmith.
  • Sun Quarry Cemetery Chérisy (191 Commonwealth casualties of 1914-18). This cemetery takes its name from a flint quarry, known to the army as Sun Quarry, situated a few km at South-East of Chérisy. Cemetery designed by G. H. Goldsmith.
  • Roll of honour in memory of priests and seminarians of Arras diocese in Remembrance: A few years after the war's end, the union of veterans and enlisted priests of Pas-de-Calais publish a roll of honour in memory of priests and seminarians of Arras diocese in Remembrance. The list include 33 names of priests, 35 names of seminary students.


Courcelles-le-Comte

  • Railway Cutting Cemetery (108 casualties of 1914-18). The village was taken by the 3rd Division on 21 August 1918 and Railway Cutting Cemetery was made after the capture. Buried here are men of the 2nd, 3rd, 37th and 63rd Divisions who died in the area in August 1918.  
  • Warry Copse Cemetery (40 casualties of 1914-18). This cemetery was  made by the 3rd Division Burial Officer at the end of August 1918. 
  • French military cemetery (battle of Courcelles, 3rd october 1914) (place called Derrière la Haute Rue)


Croisilles

  • Croisilles British Cemetery (1 171 casualties of 1914-18) (chemin de Bapaume, places called Vallée de Vaux and Grosse Saule). The 7th Division attacked Croisilles in March 1917 and took it on 2 April. It was lost on 21 March 1918 and recaptured by the 56th (London) Division on the following 28 August, after heavy fighting. Plots I and II of the cemetery, were made between April 1917 and March 1918 and the rest was formed after the Armistice. In this cemetery, there are also 18 German casualties. A memorial commemorate casualties buried in Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt Communal Cemetery in 1917, whose graves were destroyed by shell fire.  
  • Croisilles Railway Cemetery (181 casualties of 1914-18) (places called la Solette and Vallée de Vaux). It was begun by the 21st Manchesters at the beginning of April 1917 and used by units of various divisions until January 1918. There are 26 German burials. 
  • Summit trench Cemetery Croisilles (74 casualties of 1914-18) (chemin Saint-Martin, place called Bons Enfants). The "Summit trench" was part of the Hindenburg Line, on a low hill between Croisilles and Hénin. This  battle cemetery is 90 metres west of the site of the trench and was made at the end of August 1918 by the 56th (London) Division.


Douchy-lès-Ayette

  • Douchy-les-Ayette British Cemetery (more than 700 casualties of 1914-18) (rue d'Ayette, place called le Bosquet parfait). Douchy-les-Ayette was in German occupation from October 1914 to the 21st March 1917. This cemetery was begun in August and September, 1918, by the 3rd Division Burial Officer. After the armistice, it was enlarged by the  concentration of graves from the battlefields of Arras and the Ancre. 


Ecoust-Saint-Mein

  • Ecoust St Mein British Cemetery (151 casualties of 1914-18). The 2nd April 1917, Croisilles and Ecoust were captured by the 7th British Division. This cemetery was begun in August 1918. The British Cemetery was then made, in continuation of a German Extension (now removed) of the communal cemetery.  
  • Ecoust Military Cemetery (156 casualties of 1914-18). The 2nd April 1917, Croisilles and Ecoust were captured by the 7th British Division. This cemetery was begun in August 1918. The cemetery contains also 71 German burials. Cemetery designed by W H Cowlishaw.
  • H.A.C. Cemetery Ecoust St Mein (almost 2 000 casualties of 1914-18) (H.A.C. = Honorable Artillery Company) (chemin de Bapaume, place called Voie de Plonge).
  • L’homme mort British Cemetery (166 casualties of 1914-18) (chemin de l'Homme Mort). The hamlet of L'Homme Mort saw fighting in March and August 1918. The first row of this cemetery was made in August 1918. After the armistice, casualties were  brought in from the neighbouring battlefields. 


Ervillers

  • Ervillers Military Cemetery (67 casualties of 1914-18) (place called Courtil Brien). Ervillers was occupied by Commonwealth troops in March 1917, evacuated a year later after an obstinate defence by the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division, and retaken by the 2nd Division on the following 23 August. Two cemeteries were made by the Germans at Ervillers. The first cemetery contains casualties of some Commonwealth prisoners. The second, begun in the garden of the Mayor's house in March 1918, has been removed. 


Favreuil

  • Favreuil British Cemetery (almost 400 casualties of 1914-18) (chemin de la Voix du Prêtre, place called les Vingts). In March 1917, Favreuil was occupied by British troops. Lost in March 1918, the village is  retaken by the 37th and New Zealand Divisions on the 25th August. This cemetery was begun from April 1917 to March 1918 by the fighting units (particularly the 62nd division (West Riding) and Field Ambulances.  Further burials were made in August and September 1918. After the Armistice, British graves were brought in from the neighbouring battlefields. Today, there are almost 400 casualties.
  • Plaque in memory of Favreuil children in Remembrance during the WW1. Localisation: Church Saint-Georges.

Foncquevillers

  • Foncquevillers Military Cemetery (648 casualties of 1914-18). In 1915 and 1916 the Allied front line ran between Foncquevillers and Gommecourt. The cemetery was begun by French troops, and taken over by Commonweatlh forces. It remained in use by units and field ambulances until March 1917. The cemetery was used again from March to August 1918, when the German offensive brought the front line back to nearly the old position. Foncquevillers was "adopted" by the town of Derby. The cemetery contains 648 Commonwealth casualties and 4 German casualties. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield. 
  • Gommecourt Wood New Cemetery (748 casualties of 1914-18). Gommecourt Wood New Cemetery was made, after the Armistice, when graves were brought in from the battlefields of July 1916, March 1917, and March, April and August 1918, and from certain smaller burial grounds. There are 748 Commonwealth burials. 

Fontaine-lès-Croisilles

  • Monument of West Yorkshire Regiment


Gomiécourt

  • Gomiécourt South Cemetery (206 casualties of 1914-18) (chemin d'Ervillers à Achiet-le-Grand). Gomiecourt village was captured by the 3rd Division on 23 August 1918. The cemetery was made by the 62nd Division Burial Officer at the end of August 1918. There are also 27 German burials.

 Grévillers

  • Grévillers British Cemetery. The village of Grevillers was occupied by Commonwealth troops on 14 March 1917 and in April and May, the 3rd, 29th and 3rd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations were posted nearby. They began the cemetery and continued to use it until March 1918, when Grevillers was lost to the German during their great advance. The 24th August, the New Zealand Division recaptured the village. After the armistice, 200 graves were brought in this cemetery. 2106 casualties of 1914-1918 and 18 French casualties. There are also 7 casualties of 1939-1945.
  • Stele in memory of Oswald-Johnston Wainwright. Situated in the Loupart wood, inaugurated in 2005. Fell under the German machine gun the 25th August 1918, his body wasn't found (his name is on the memorial of Vis-en-Artois). He was at the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
  • New Zealand memorial. 7 memorials were erected in France and Belgium to those New Zealand soldiers who died on the Western Front and whose graves are not known. The Caterpillar Valley Memorial commemorates almost 450 officers and men of the New Zealand Division who died in the defensive fighting in the area from March to August 1918, and in the Advance to Victory between 8 August and 11 November 1918, more 9 000 prisoners and 145 cannons. During the same period, there are 2600 casualties. Almost 450 of them are evocated on the memorial. Text of the memorial : « Here are recorded the names of officers and men of New Zealand who fell in the battles of the Somme, March to August, 1918, and in the final victorious advance August to November 1918. Their graves are known only to God ».
Monument aux morts de Bullecourt consacré au conflit de la Première Guerre Mondiale.Cliquez sur l'image pour zoomer
Monument aux morts de Bullecourt consacré au conflit de la Première Guerre Mondiale.

Havrincourt

  • Monument at the 62th Yorshire division (which won fame in several localities of area in 1917). Decree authorizing the build of the monument the 23rd May 1923. 
  • Grand ravine British Cemetery (place called le Petit Ravin de Trescault). Havrincourt village was stormed by the 62nd (West Riding) Division on 20 November 1917. It was lost on 23 March 1918, but it was retaken on 12 September by the 62nd Division. This cemetery begun in December 1917 by the graves service of the 62nd division. Today, 139 First World War burials. Cemetery designed by N. A. Rew.
  • Lowrie Cemetery (chemin des Postes, place called la Voie d'Inchy).This cemetery was was made by the 3rd Division Burial Officer at the beginning of October 1918. 251 casualties. Cemetery designed by N. A. Rew.

Hébuterne

  • Gommecourt British Cemetery n°2 (1357 casualties of 1914-18). Hebuterne village remained in Allied hands from March 1915 to the Armistice, although during the German advances of the summer of 1918, it was practically on the front line. Gommecourt was adopted by the County Borough of Wolverhampton. Gommecourt British Cemeteries N°1, N°2, N°3 and N°4 were made in 1917 when the battlefields were cleared. N°2 originally contained 101 graves of 1 July 1916, almost all of the 56th Division. After the Armistice, graves from the neighbouring battlefields were added. There are 1357 Commonwealth casualties. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.
  • Hebuterne Communal Cemetery. This cemetery contains 58 Commonwealth casualties. 
  • Hébuterne Military Cemetery (761 casualties of 1914-18). The village gave its name to a severe action fought by the French on the 10th-13th June 1915, in the "Second Battle of Artois". Hebuterne Military Cemetery was begun by the 48th (South Midland) Division in August 1915, and used by fighting units and Field Ambulances (particularly those of the 56th (London) Division) until the spring of 1917; and it was reopened in 1918. There are 761 Commonwealth casualties.
  • Owl Trench Cemetery (53 casualties of 1914-18). "Owl Trench" was a German cross-trench before Rossignol Wood, raided by the 4th New Zealand Rifle Brigade on 15 July 1918, and cleared by the 1st Auckland Regiment five days later. The cemetery, however, contains the graves of men who died on 27 February 1917, in an attack on German rearguards by the 31st Division. The cemetery contains 53 Commonwealth burials. The cemetery was designed by N A Rew.
  • Railway Hollow Cemetery (109 casualties of 1914-18). The cemetery was made by the V Corps when the Somme battlefields were cleared in 1917, and contains the graves of soldiers of the 3rd, 19th and 31st Divisions who died on 1 July and 13 November 1916, and 5 February 1917. The cemetery contains 107 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. There are also two French war graves. The cemetery was designed by W.C Von Berg.
  • Rossignol Wood Cemetery (101 casualties of 1914_18). Rossignol Wood was taken by the Germans at the end of March 1918 and recovered in the following July. The cemetery was begun in March 1917, by the 46th Division Burial Officer. The German plot was added after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields immediately to the south and south-west. The cemetery contains 41 Commonwealth casualties and 40 German casualties. The cemetery was designed by N A Rew.

Hermies

  • Hermies British Cemetery. Hermies village was seized on the morning of the 9th April 1917, by a surprise attack of the 2nd and 3rd Australian Infantry Battalions. It was held against the advancing Germans on the 22nd March 1918, by the 17th Division, but evacuated on the following day; and it was retaken in September 1918r. This cemetery was made in April-December 1917, by fighting units and Field Ambulances. 106 soldiers in this cemetery. 
  • Hermies Hill British Cemetery (places called la Solette, Chez Delsaux and Cour Delsaux). was begun in November 1917, and carried on by fighting units until March 1918, and further graves were added in the following September and graves are added after the armistice. There are 1036 soldiers.

Lebucquière

  • Lebucquière Communal Cemetery Extension (place called la Cornée). The village was occupied by Commonwealth forces on 19 March 1917, following the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line. It was recaptured by the Germans on 23 March 1918, after fierce resistance by the 19th (Western) Division, and was finally reoccupied by the 5th Division on 3 September 1918. The communal cemetery extension was begun on 24 March 1917 and was used by the 1st Australian Division and other units for almost a year. At the armistice, the cemetery countained 150 burials. Today, there are 774 casualties. Cemetery designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

Léchelle

  • Five Points Cemetery (101 casualties of 1914-18). Lechelle was captured for the second time early in September, 1918, and the cemetery was made by the 53rd Field Ambulance and the 18th Casualty Clearing Station, which were posted near the site. In this cemetery, there are 101 Commonwealth burials. 

Ligny-Thilloy

  • Beaulencourt British Cemetery (place called les Dix-huit). The cemetery was made originally by the 3rd, 4th, 43rd and 58th Casualty Clearing Stations, which were posted in Beaulencourt at different periods after the middle of September 1918. It was greatly enlarged after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the neighbouring battlefields. More than 700 casualties.  

Martinpuich

  • Porch. Inaugurated in September 1925, built by the British of the 47th division (London). At top of the porch, we can read the inscription : "To the memory of our fallen comrades of the 47th (London) division. 1915-1918". On the sides, the names of great battles : "Aubers, Festubert (1915), Loos, Somme (1916-1918), Flers-Courcelette, Le Transloy, Messines (1917), Ypres (1917" ; "Cambrai (1917, Saint-Quentin, Bapaume (1918), Ancre (1918), Albert (1918), pursuit to Mons, France & Flanders (1915-1918)"
  • Martinpuich British Cemetery (place called la Bouilloire). Martinpuich was captured by the 15th (Scottish) Division on 15 September 1916, lost in April 1918, and retaken in August 1918. This cemetery was  begun in November 1916 and used by fighting units and field ambulances until June 1917, and again at the end of August 1918. 115 casualties.  
  • Martinpuich Communal Cemetery. This cemetery contains five Commonwealth burials of the First World War, one of which is unidentified; regiment concerned : Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1 grave), Royal Field Artillery (2 graves), Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (1 grave)

Metz-en-Couture

  • Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery British Extension (place called le Cimetière). The village was captured by the 10th and 11th King's Royal Rifle Corps on the 4th and 5th April 1917, evacuated on the 23rd March 1918, and retaken by the 1st Otago Regiment on the following 6th September. The village was adopted by Halifax. There are almost 500 British casualties. This extension was begun in April 1917, and used until March 1918.  

Morchies

  • Morchies Australian Cemetery. Morchies was occupied by British troops on the 20th March 1917; lost on the 21st March 1918; and retaken in September 1918. At the end of the war, the village was adopted by Barking. This cemetery was  begun by Australian units at the end of March 1917, and used until the end of April. 4 burials were made by the Germans in March 1918. 61 casualties.  
  • Morchies Communal Cemetery. This cemetery contains the graves of eight First World War casualties. 
  • Morchies Military Cemetery. (chemin de Morchies, places called les Nuits au chemin de Noreuil and les Dix-Sept). This cemetery was begun in April 1917, and used until January 1918. 163 casualties. Cemetery designed by W.H. Colishaw

Morval

  • Morval British Cemetery (place called la Plaine du Moulin). Morval was captured by the 5th Division on 25 September 1916, and remained in the hands of the Allies until 24 March 1918 and the German advance. It was regained by the 38th (Welsh) Division, after fierce fighting, on 1 September 1918. The cemetery was made by V Corps in the same month. There are 54 casualties died between the 26th August and the 6th September 1918. Cemetery designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.
  • Morval communal cemetery. Graves of 2 British aviators.

Mory

  • Mory Abbey Military Cemetery. Mory village was occupied by Commonwealth troops in the middle of March 1917. It was lost after obstinate defence by the 40th and 34th Division a year later and recaptured towards the end of the following August, after severe fighting, by the 62nd (West Riding) and Guard Divisions. The cemetery contains 619 Commonwealth casualties and 230 German casualties. 

Moyenneville

  • Moyenneville (two tree) Cemetery (chemin du Bois, place called Bois Warnier). The village of Moyenneville was occupied by the 7th Division on the 17th March 1917, lost at the end of the following March, and recaptured by the Guards Division on the 21st August, 1918. Almost 50 casualties; almost all these soldiers belonged either to the 15th West Yorkshire Regiment.

Neuville-Bourjonval

  • Neuville-Bourjonval British Cemetery (place called Entre Deux Bois). Neuville-Bourjonval village was taken on the 28th-29th March 1917, by the 12th King's Liverpool Regiment, lost on the 22nd March 1918, and retaken on the following 4th and 5th September by the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division. The British Cemetery was begun by the 11th Rifle Brigade in April, 1917 and used by the 42nd and other Divisions until March 1918. Further burials were made in September 1918. There are 205 casualties.

Noreuil

  • Noreuil Australian Cemetery (place called les Harrys). Noreuil was the scene of a fierce engagement between Australian troops and the Germans on 15 April 1917. This cemetery was started at the beginning of April 1917 and used until the following December (but more 80 graves destroyed by shell fire). 4 graves were made in September 1918. There are 244 Commonwealth casualties.

Puisieux

  • Luke Copse British Cemetery (72 casualties of 1914-18). The village of Puisieux was taken by Commonwealth forces on the 28 February 1917, lost on the 26 March 1918 and recovered on the following 21 August. It is named from one of four small plantations that were on or close behind that line, between Serre and Hebuterne. The graves are of casualties of the 31st and 3rd Divisions, who died in attacks on 1 July and 13 November 1916. There are 72 Commonwealth burials. The cemetery was designed by N A Rew.
  • Puisieux Communal Cemetery. In this cemetery, there are 3 Commonwealth casualties. 
  • Queens cemetery (311 casualties of 1914-18). The graves are of casualties of the 31st, 3rd and 19th Divisions who died in July and November 1916, and February 1917. There are now 311 First World War burials in the cemetery. The cemetery was designed by N A Rew.
  • Serre Road Cemetery (85 casualties of 1914-18). The "Serre Road" was, in June 1916, the road leading out of Mailly-Maillet, in British hands and entering No Man's Land about 1,170 metres South-West of Serre, which was held by the Germans. After 2 attacks, the Germans evacuated Serre on 24 February 1917, and the 22nd Manchesters entered the village on the following morning. Serre Road Cemetery No.3, was made by the V Corps in the spring of 1917. There are 85 Commonwealth casualties (mainly of the 31st Division) who fell in July and November 1916.
  • Ten Tree Alley Cemetery (67 casualties of 1914-18). The cemetery was made by the V Corps in 1917 and it stood beside a former German trench, captured by the 32nd Division on the night of the 10th-11th February 1917. In this cemetery, there are 67 Commonwealth burials. 

Riencourt-lès-Bapaume

  • Riencourt-les-Bapaume, Manchester Cemetery. Riencourt was occupied by Commonwealth forces in March 1917. It was lost on 24 March 1918 during the German offensive and recaptured by the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division on the evening of 30 August 1918. There are 72 casualties. Cemetery designed by W.H. Colishaw.

Rocquigny

  • Rocquigny Communal Cemetery. In this cemetery there are 4 Commonwealth casualties. 

Ruyaulcourt

  • Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery (place called les Peupliers). Ruyaulcourt village was attacked by the 7th D.C.L.I. on the 28th/29th March 1917, lost again on the 23rd March 1918 and finally cleared by the New Zealand Division on the 4th September 1918. This cemetery was  begun in April 1917, and used by fighting units and Field Ambulances (largely of the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division). 348 casualties. 

Sailly-au-Bois

  • Sailly-au-Bois Military Cemetery (240 casualties of 1914-18). The cemetery was begun in May 1916. It was used by field ambulances and fighting units until March 1917 and again from April to August 1918. The cemetery contains 239 Commonwealth burials and a German casualty. The cemetery was designed by W C Von Berg.

Saint-Léger

  • Mory Street Military Cemetery (route de Saint-Quentin, place called Fosse Renault). Mory and St. Leger were occupied by Commonwealth troops in the middle of March 1917. They were lost after obstinate defence by the 40th and 34th Divisions a year after and recaptured towards the end of the following August, after severe fighting, by the 62nd (West Riding) and Guards Division. This cemetery was begun in 1917 by the British troops. 66 casualties. 
  • Saint-Léger British Cemetery (place called Goulâtre). This cemetery was begun in March 1917 and used by fighting units and field ambulances until March 1918. 184 casualties.

Sapignies

  • German military cemetery (place called Le Village). In this cemetery, there are 1550 German casualties. Open in 1916 by the German troops, it widen during the conflict. After the war, in 1924, French authorities added almost 400 casualties. Purchase of terrain by decree public use order of 27th May 1929.  

Le Sars

  • Near the calvary, we find the base of a war memorial of 111th German infantry regiment reserve. 
  • Le Sars Communal Cemetery. In the cemetery, a British casualty.

Souastre

  • Souastre Churchyard. One Commonwealth casualty. 

Le Transloy

  • War memorial of fighting of August 1914.

Trescault

  • British monument. Text of the dedication : « In memory of officers, non-commissioned officer, and soldiers of the 42th east territorial division of Lancaster who did the sacrifice of their life for their king and their homeland during the First World War, and in commemoration of the attack and the conquest of the Hindenburg line in Trescault the 28th September 1918 ».
  • Ribecourt Road Cemetery (chemin de Cambrai à Péronne, place called la ferme de Bilhem). Ribecourt was taken on the 20th November 1917 by the 6th Division. Lost in March 1918 and recaptured by the 3rd and 42nd (East Lancashire) Divisions on the following 27th September. The rows B, C and D of this cemetery contain graves of November 1917 to February 1918, chiefly of the 51st and 59th Divisions. But almost of this graves are soldiers of the 42th division (October 1918). There are 253 casualties. 
  • Trescault Communal Cemetery. In this communal cemetery, we find 6 British casualties. 

Vaulx-Vraucourt

  • Vaulx Australian Field Ambulance Cemetery. Vaulx-Vraucourt was taken in the spring of 1917, lost (after severe fighting) in March 1918, and retaken in the following September. This cemetery was begun in April 1917 and used until February 1918. 52 British casualties and 61 German casualties.
  • Vaulx Hill Cemetery. Vaulx Hill Cemetery started with just 17 graves of September 1918. The rest of the cemetery was formed after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields in the immediate neighbourhood. 856 casualties. 
  • Vraucourt Copse Cemetery. The copse from which it is named lies to the north. The cemetery originally contained 43 Commonwealth graves of 2 and 3 September 1918 (mainly of the 3rd Division). In 1928, graves were brought in of Vaulx Advanced Dressing Station Cemetery. 104 casualties.

Villers au Flos

  • German military cemetery (place called Auprès de la Cense). There are 2449 casualties of World War I. This cemetery was used from October 1914. After the war, the French authorities assembled almost 800 casualties find on the battlefields around, in particular those of Bapaume. There is also a monument at the 14th reserve corps, inaugurated outside the cemetery of Bapaume in 1915 by the prince August Wilhelm (son of Guillaume II), the king of Wurtemberg and the duke of Bade; the monument is moved at its actual place in 1933. On this monument, we can read : "Den in der Umgebung von Bapaume gefallenen Kameraden zollt seinen Dank durch dieses Denkmal das XIV. Reservekorps 1914 - 1918".

Warlencourt-Eaucourt

  • Warlencourt British Cemetery (route de Bapaume à Albert, places called les Culs Notés, les Dix-huit and Courcoupe Gueule). Warlencourt, the Butte de Warlencourt and Eaucourt-L'Abbaye were the scene of very fierce fighting in 1916. Eaucourt was taken by the 47th (London) Division early in October. This cemetery was made late in 1919 when graves were brought in from small cemeteries and the battlefields of Warlencourt and Le Sars. The cemetery contains almost 3505 casualties. Cemetery designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.
  • Memorial of the Butte de Warlencourt. Inaugurated in 1990. The Butte de Warlencourt marked the stop of British advance during the battle of the Somme in 1916. 

Contact the Tourist Office

Few ways to contact the Tourist Office

By phone

+33.321.598.984

Opening hours

Monday to friday from 9:30 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:30

Coming to the tourist office

10, place Faidherbe
62450 BAPAUME

Write an email to tourist office